Selective Schools Test Mathematical Reasoning | Tutor Tips

The maths test is a really important section in the selective schools exam. This is why a good maths score is important if you want to get to selective schools. Any score between 35 -50 is quite good. If your English score is average, you can boost your overall points with the maths score because the mathematical reasoning test is quite easy in the new selective test. For example, if you score 35 plus in mathematical reasoning, 50 plus in GA, and a writing score of about 15, you can expect to get above 250 in the selective exam. So that shows you the importance of the mathematical reasoning test.

At Scholarly, we have made significant progress in our scores in the selective tests from our sample tests. We have got many children who improved by adding 50 plus marks in the actual Selective exam. These improvements were mainly made because of the improvements they made in the mathematical reasoning section. Obviously, some of these kids did really well in writing as well. But again, writing and English don’t really play that big of a role in boosting scores, especially if you’re not aiming for 270. As long as you are aiming at an average score, you’ll be okay without bothering to work on your mathematical reasoning ability.

math selective schools test answers

How to prepare for the Selective Schools Test?

Before enrolling your child in a coaching centre to improve their mathematical  reasoning, you need to do your research properly. Many coaching canters don’t really know what is in the new Selective school exam. They also give many random questions, which are actually not based on the exam, and I think a lot of you guys see that. Some of the tutors are also not competent in their work and only care about making money rather than guiding the children the right way.

Now, in the past selective exam, statistics and graphs were definitely one of the biggest challenges. Most students failed in these questions. This is because most kids go through past papers bought from the local bookshop. These materials don’t have many example questions, and you might only find two or three questions on statistics and graphs, which are not sufficient for practice. The selective exam has at least 20% of the questions based on statistics and graphs, which is a huge portion. You need to ensure that you are using the right materials and practicing for the selective exams using sample questions that have been tested before.

Money questions are very common with selective exams. They are, however, not difficult. The selective school examiners are unlikely to give too much really difficult problem-solving. Instead, they are more likely to give questions than most kids can do. Area and perimeter questions are also common in a typical selective maths test. In the past selective exam, there was a perimeter question from a figure with a triangle inside a hexagon. This means that in the future, kids are likely to be tested on areas and perimeters of overlapping figures. Many people are just doing simple areas and perimeters of rectangles, triangles and circles, which they won’t get tested on. You’re going to get tested more on the compound areas and the composite figures with overlapping cancellations. It is therefore very important that you spend the time practicing in order to understand how to do those types of questions.

Before enrolling your child in a coaching centre to improve their mathematical reasoning, you need to do your research properly. Many coaching centres don’t really know what is in the new Selective school exam. They also give many random questions, which are actually not based on the exam, and I think a lot of you guys see that. Some of the tutors are also not competent in their work and only care about making money rather than guiding the children the right way.

Now, in the past selective exam, statistics and graphs were definitely one of the biggest challenges. Most students failed in these questions. This is because most kids go through past papers bought from the local bookshop. These materials don’t have many example questions, and you might only find two or three questions on statistics and graphs, which are not sufficient for practice. The selective exam has at least 20% of the questions based on statistics and graphs, which is a huge portion. You need to ensure that you are using the right materials and practicing for the selective exams using sample questions that have been tested before.

Money questions are very common with selective exams. They are, however, not difficult. The selective school examiners are unlikely to give too much really difficult problem-solving. Instead, they are more likely to give questions than most kids can do. Area and perimeter questions are also common in a typical selective maths test. In the past selective exam, there was a perimeter question from a figure with a triangle inside a hexagon. This means that in the future, kids are likely to be tested on areas and perimeters of overlapping figures. Many people are just doing simple areas and perimeters of rectangles, triangles and circles, which they won’t get tested on. You’re going to get tested more on the compound areas and the composite figures with overlapping cancellations. It is therefore very important that you spend the time practicing in order to understand how to do those types of questions.

Another type of question that you might be given is a constellation. When you have constellations of triangles, they might give you the area of one triangle, and they might ask you the perimeter of the rest of the bigger triangles, or they might give you the perimeter of a triangle and then ask you to find its area. These are examples of the kind of questions that you don’t really commonly see in the maths revision materials at your local bookstore. Most of the big coaching centers out there talk about area and perimeter and how it’s important to figure out the areas and perimeters of rectangles or squares. There’s no issue with that. The unfortunate thing is they don’t spend much time talking about compound areas, or compound shapes which are very challenging.

selective schools test maths

Mathematical Reasoning Summary

To quickly reiterate, you need to spend more time on statistics and graphs. It would be best if you also spent more time on these compound area and perimeter questions. The rest of the questions are all pretty simple. They obviously have algebra. But again, for algebra, you can mainly guess and check to figure out the answer. In terms of time and money, the questions are all relatively easy to do as well. On other basic calculations like division, addition, subtraction, and multiplication, you should be able to figure out the process of solving them as well.

Remember, I am giving out this important information because most of the books you might be currently using for your revision don’t cover important areas like statistics, graphs, and areas. Most coaching centres also don’t concentrate on these important areas. If you would like to receive high-standard selective school coaching for your child, fill out a form on scholarlytraining.com.

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